skip to content

EXAMINATION AIDS

Apart from pens, rulers and permitted calculators, candidates may only take aids to their place in the examination room if they have been explicitly permitted. As well as books and notes, this also applies, for example, to paper and blotting paper, irrespective of whether their content is related to the examination. Examination aids may only be used if they have been explicitly permitted by the examiner or the Examinations Board. The aids permitted by the Examinations Board are published on the Board’s website. Where different arrangements are made by the examiner, they are published on the examiners’ webpages or the Examination Board’s website.
If prohibited aids are found near an examination candidate during an examination, they will fail the examination. This rule will apply irrespective of whether the aid was actually used in the examination or whether it was useful for the specific examination question. The only factor of relevance is whether the prohibited aid could potentially have been useful in the examination.
Each examination candidate is responsible for ensuring that there are no prohibited aids near them during the examination and that there are no prohibited notes in permitted aids (e.g. legislative texts). This also applies when the candidate has borrowed the aid from someone else.
Unless otherwise specified by the examiner concerned, the following rules apply to the use of legislative texts: all collections of texts available from bookshops, including loose-leaf collections and bound text editions with an introduction (no copies!), are allowed. When setting questions for written examinations, the examiners assume that each candidate in the examination room has the currently applicable version of the relevant legislative texts. Outdated legislative texts are used at the candidates’ own risk. Underlining, highlighting and article references in the text collections are permitted. Other handwritten markings – letters and words – and any other additions, inclusion of pages, etc., are not permitted. Coloured sticky tabs can be used to find certain articles more quickly as long as there are no letters or words on them. The article reference may be written on them. This means that, for example, “§9 Abs. 1 Satz 2 HGB” (referring to Article 9(1), Sentence 2 of the German Commercial Code) is permitted but “§9 Abs. 1 Satz 2 HGB Informations- und Kommunikationssystem” or “§9 Abs. 1 Satz 2 HGB I und K” is not.
If no other rules have been explicitly stipulated for the examination in question, no electronic aids (except for permitted calculators) that could be used to store data or communicate within or outside of the examination room (e.g. mobile telephones or smartwatches) may be used.
Candidates who carry an electronic aid of this type on their person or place it within their reach will fail the examination irrespective of whether the device is switched on. Wristwatches must be removed in order to ensure that they cannot be used for cheating purposes. Candidates will not be assumed to be attempting to cheat if they place the device, switched off, beyond their reach (staircase, windowsills, etc.) before the examination starts. Carrying such an electronic device outside the examination room during the examination (when going to the toilet) constitutes a serious case of cheating. Here too, the question of whether the device is switched on plays no role. In these cases, candidates can be excluded from further examinations, thus terminating their right to sit examinations on the programme.
Persons who take prohibited aids into the examination room are, at least, guilty of an offence. This is also true of persons who attempt to influence the result of an examination to others’ benefit. By law, a fine of up to 50,000 euros can be imposed in punishment of an offence.
If a candidate disrupts an examination, e.g. due to their mobile telephone ringing, the examiner or invigilator can exclude the candidate from the rest of the examination. In this case, they will fail the examination.
The institutes/departments can make additional rules concerning the use of aids in their examinations.

Students who fail an examination in a module due to cheating or due to an offence cannot request additional examination attempts of the type described in Section 20(1) of the applicable bachelor or master examination regulations.

Calculators

When setting questions for written examinations, the examiners assume that that every candidate has a scientific calculator with the usual mathematical functions (basic arithmetic operations, percentage, square and square root functions, power function and logarithmic and trigonometric functions). Candidates are responsible for ensuring that their calculator works properly.
With the exception of calculators that do not have the complete alphabet on their keypad, calculators that enable text to be stored are not permitted. CAS calculators are also not allowed. In cases of doubt, candidates must present their calculator when asked by an invigilator at the end of the examination so that it can be checked by the Examinations Board. A list of the devices permitted is published on the Calculators page of the WiSo Examination Office website. The list is updated on an ongoing basis and the invigilators are supplied with copies. The same page also explains what to do in cases of doubt regarding devices that have not yet been approved.
Use of prohibited devices constitutes attempted cheating, which will be punished in accordance with the examination regulations.

Dictionaries

The use of dictionaries is prohibited during all examinations. This includes the use of dictionaries in exams in English.

Notwithstanding this regulation, examination candidates who do not have a German qualification for university entrance may use foreign language-German dictionaries in the bachelor examinations on request. Specialist terminology dictionaries are not permitted. The dictionaries must not include any handwritten markings whatsoever.

Candidates wishing to use dictionaries must submit a request, along with a copy of their general qualification for university entrance (e.g. DSH certificate), to the Examination Office at least three weeks before the written examinations start. If all the criteria are met, they will receive a letter of notification, which they must take into the examination room with them so that the invigilator can check whether they are allowed to use a dictionary. If the candidate cannot present the letter of notification, they will not be allowed to use dictionaries and may be given a fail for the examination

 

SPECIAL PROVISIONS FOR SPECIFIC EXAMINATIONS

  • Core Module Civil Property and Economic Law

  • Examination component in Law for Economists in the Advanced Module Institutions

  • Supplementary Module Health Law

All collections of texts available from bookshops, including loose-leaf collections and bound text editions with an introduction (no copies!), are allowed. When setting questions for written examinations, the examiners assume that each candidate in the examination room has the currently applicable version of the relevant legislative texts. Outdated legislative texts are used at the candidates’ own risk.
Underlining, highlighting and article references in the text collections are permitted. Other handwritten markings – letters and words – and any other additions, inclusion of pages, etc., are not permitted. Coloured sticky tabs can be used to find certain articles more quickly as long as there are no letters or words on them. The article reference may be written on them. This means that, for example, “§9 Abs. 1 Satz 2 HGB” (referring to Article 9(1), Sentence 2 of the German Commercial Code) is permitted but “§9 Abs. 1 Satz 2 HGB Informations- und Kommunikationssystem” or “§9 Abs. 1 Satz 2 HGB I und K” is not.
The invigilator will check the legislative texts in the examination room to ensure that no handwritten markings or additions have been made.
Using a collection of texts containing prohibited markings or additions usually results in a fail irrespective of whether the marking or addition relates to the specific examination question. Candidates will be subject to the consequences of prohibited markings or additions even if they did not make them themselves, for example, if they borrowed the collection of texts they are using.
Other aids, such as calculators, etc., are not necessary in the examination and are not permitted.

  • Core Module Statistics

  • Advanced Module Statistics

Until further notice, candidates in both examinations are permitted to use their own copy (i.e. not provided by the Examination Office) of the following formula collection:
E. Bomsdorf, E. Gröhn, K. Mosler und F. Schmid: Definitionen, Formeln und Tabellen zur Statistik.
In both examinations, as in all examinations, candidates are also permitted to use a scientific calculator.
When setting the questions for written examinations, the examiners assume that every candidate in the examination room has the above-mentioned aids.
Markings of any nature may be made in the above-mentioned collection of formulas. However, no extra pages bearing markings may be inserted or glued into the collection. Such additions are considered an offence or cheating and the legal consequences will apply.
The invigilator will check the formula collections in the examination room to ensure that they are as permitted and to determine whether any additions have been made. The legal consequence of using a prohibited collection of formulas or using a collection of formulas with prohibited additions is usually a fail in the examination irrespective of whether the additions on the pages inserted into the collection relate to the specific examination question. Candidates will be subject to the consequences of prohibited additions to the formula collection even if they did not make them themselves, for example, if they borrowed the formula collection they are using.

  • Core Module Mathematics

  • Core Module Mathematics / Methods. Block I: Mathematics for Economists

Please refer to the information given by the examiner with regard to the rules for aids permitted in the examination in the core module on Mathematics (Business Information Technology).

Each student may bring a handwritten collection of formulas to the examination. The following rules apply: candidates are only permitted to use one single A4 print-out of the form supplied in the relevant Ilias course. Their initials and matriculation number must be written in the designated places on the form. Other than that, the formula collection must be handwritten by the candidate him or herself. (Candidates may also write on the back of the A4 sheet. The content is completely up to them). The formula collection must be handed in with the examination paper. Any deviation from these rules will be considered attempted cheating.